alt text here
Boynton Hall Table

In 1907, Frank Lloyd Wright designed and built the E. E. Boynton House in Rochester, New York at a cost of $55,000. Wright frequently traveled to the building site, even though the job-site was over 600 miles from his studio in Oak Park, Illinois. He had workmen on the site construct a rudimentary shelter so that he could “camp” there during construction.

The Boynton Hall Table incorporates cantilevers characteristic of Wright’s designs throughout his career. Constructed to original design, as confirmed by on-site measurements, it was re-issued in 2006 by Copeland Furniture of Bradford, Vermont. Each piece bears a unique serial number, its date of manufacture, and the signature of Frank Lloyd Wright.

alt text here
Coonley Occasional Tables

In 1907, Frank Lloyd Wright designed a house for Avery and Queen Coonley in Riverside, Illinois. The Coonley house is Wright’s largest Prairie-style residence and one of his most impressive projects. Located on a large, riverside parcel of land, Wright used this site to join the home and the garden into what he called “organic architecture”.

The Coonley Nesting End Table is constructed to Wright’s original design. It was re-issued in 2006 by Copeland Furniture of Bradford, Vermont. The Coonley Coffee Table is adapted from Wright’s original end table design. It was issued in 2006 by Copeland Furniture of Bradford, Vermont. Each piece bears a unique serial number, its date of manufacture, and the signature of Frank Lloyd Wright.

alt text here
Dana-Thomas Occasional Chair

In 1902, Susan Dana Lawrence, of Springfield, Illinois, commissioned Frank Lloyd Wright to design and build her a grand residence suitable for entertaining. Wright designed the entire interior, furnishings, stained glass windows and textiles in addition to this 12,500 square foot historic masterpiece. A matched pair of these chairs can still be found in the master bedroom of the home.

The Dana-Thomas Occasional Chair is constructed to Wright’s original design. It was re-issued in 2006 by Copeland Furniture of Bradford, Vermont. Each piece bears a unique serial number, its date of manufacture, and the signature of Frank Lloyd Wright.

alt text here
Taliesin Barrel Chair

The Barrel Chair is one of Frank Lloyd Wright's most recognized furniture designs and an icon of design and style. Originally designed in 1903 for the Darwin D. Martin House, Wright re-designed the chair in 1937 for the Herbert F. Johnson House, "Wingspread", in Racine, Wisconsin. Around that time, Barrel Chairs were also made for Mr. Wright's own house, Taliesin, in Spring Green, Wisconsin.

This Taliesin Barrel Chair is produced from Wright's drawings and on-site measurements at Taliesin. It was re-issued in 2006 by Copeland Furniture of Bradford, Vermont. The piece bears a unique serial number, its date of manufacture, and the signature of Frank Lloyd Wright.

Home \ Icons and Living Room